Body Chemical Peel brings about a significant improvement in skin rejuvenation. In this procedure a low concentration of the peeling agent TCA (Trichloroacetic Acid) is mixed with a special base prior to its application. Application of the peeling solution on the skin initiates the peeling process. And causes the topmost (dead layer of the skin) to slowly peel off. In a few weeks a healthier skin replaces the old skin.

Alternative to Body Chemical Peel could be laser skin resurfacing, microdermabrasion, or Coolaser technique.

Body Chemical Peel is the treatment of choice for many. The process is like sanding the surface of a damaged table so that the scars, and discolorations are less noticeable. Though healing takes 3 to 7 days, a 60% to 80% improvement can usually be expected depending on the type and extent of scarring.

The best candidates for Body Chemical Peel are men and women who are physically healthy, psychologically stable, and realistic in their expectations. Most are 18 or older, but if discolorations and acne scars are a problem, you may decide to have this procedure at a younger age.The best candidates for Body Chemical Peel are men and women who are physically healthy, psychologically stable, and realistic in their expectations. Most are 18 or older, but if discolorations and acne scars are a problem, you may decide to have this procedure at a younger age.

Dramatic responses to chemical body peel are often seen in one or two treatments. However following treatments may be necessary to achieve optimal results.

Body Chemical Peel is one of the safest procedures available for skin rejuvenation. However, medical treatment is not an exact science and the degree of the improvement is variable. Occasionally there is not improvement and another form of treatment may be required. Long-term complications resulting form Body Chemical Peels are rare. Due to the light nature of the peel, complications usually seen in deeper peels, laser of dermabrasion procedures such as keloids, or scars are possible, but are unlikely to occur. Infections due to bacterial contamination may occur if post-peel instructions are not followed. Temporary, mild pigmentation problems may occur and can usually be corrected using bleaching systems.

After Body Chemical Peel some patients return to work the same day, although most patients require a longer recovery time. This may last up to several days.

During the Body Chemical Peeling procedure you may experience some discomfort, similar to a transient stinging sensation, during the treatment. A numbing cream and application of local anesthetics may be advised by your physician to the treatment to reduce any discomfort.

Avoid direct exposure to sunlight for 4 weeks prior to the Body Chemical Peel treatment. Use a SPF 30 or greater sunscreen. If you have been instructed by the treating physician, use the topical cream 4-6 weeks prior to each treatment. Take oral antibiotics and antiviral medications if prescribed by your physician.

Avoid direct exposure to sunlight during the first 6 weeks following your Body Chemical Peeling procedure. An SPF 30 or greater sunscreen should be used once your skin has healed. Trauma such as scratching or picking the treated area should be avoided. Showers are permitted but gently pat the area to dry. Wash the treated area with a mild soap and apply Aquaphor Healing Ointment twice daily until the area has healed. Swimming and contact sports should be avoided until your skin has healed completely. Make up may be worn after the treatment area has healed completely. Immediately postoperatively, cooled gel packs or ice may be applied to the skin surface to reduce postoperative erythema (redness) and swelling. Any discomfort or burning at the treatment site may be relieved by taking Tylenol, or other mediations prescribed by your physician, and the application of ice compresses, hydrocortisone cream, or Calendula gel. If crusts or scabs develop, allow them to fall of on their own.