Aesthetic Medicine Today and Tomorrow

As technology and medicine advance, doctors have found even better ways to get rid of wrinkles, laugh lines, and other signs of aging. Some use existing methods, like disease fighting drugs and others use more precise instruments. As a result, first generation treatments are being outstripped by their second generation heirs. Dermal fillers once lasted three to six months; now, they can last two years or more. New minimally invasive procedures mean that we can not only get work done during our lunch break, but we’ll even have time to meet up for a bite right afterward. Intense swelling and painful abrasion are being replaced by (nearly) painless light and lasers.

We no longer have to worry about finding a place to hide while a facelift heals. Today’s skin treatments show full results in days. And in the future, that time could be cut down to hours or even minutes.

In addition, not only are the older treatments being replaced by better, faster ones, but they are often are less expensive. The economy may be improving, according to some, but people are still putting off elective procedures in the interests of saving money. Plastic surgeons and other doctors understand this, and in turn, they have reduced their prices and created effective promotions.

Dysport Moving in On Botox’s Turf

“I don’t think the introduction of Dysport will spark a price war with Botox. But it will give us another tool we can use to better serve our patients, “ says Dr. Simon Ourian, a cosmetic dermatologist with a thriving practice in Beverly Hills. Both drugs are made from the bacteria Chlostridium botulinum, a known toxin that causes botulism in food, in minuscule amounts. Dysport was recently FDA approved, and will also be used to fight wrinkles.

Lashes Like a Newborn

Lashes Like a NewbornAllergan Inc, the makers of Botox, have stumbled upon yet another exciting discovery. Their bimatopost ophthmalmic solution, first used to treat glaucoma, was found to stimulate the growth of eyelashes in a big way. Ophthalmologists noted that their patients’ lashes were longer, darker and thicker than before. The formula was changed slightly and went through the FDA process, and the result is Latisse.

Dr. Ourian has only positive reviews of this treatment. “The application process is simple, “ he says, “and each Latisse kit comes with sterile applicators so that when used properly there is no chance for cross-contamination.” There are potential side effects, of course—itchy eyelids and skin discoloration in the eye area—but the patients seem to have no problem with them. And they’re willing to do whatever it takes to grow their lashes. “Allergan really hit the mark with Latisse, “ says Dr. Ourian. “Women spend a billion dollars a year on cosmetics to achieve the appearance of longer, fuller lashes. Latisse can actually grow your lashes.”